Devotions

I Want to See

By Mary Loudermilk
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“Then Jesus answered him, ‘What do you want me to do for you?’ ‘Rabboni,’ the blind man said to him, ‘I want to see’” (Mark 10:51, Christian Standard Bible).

As Jesus walked the dry, dusty roads of the land, it was not unusual for Him to encounter those who were blind. The conditions in which they lived—the hot sun and the fine dust floating in the air—combined to damage their vision. This day Jesus and His disciples were near Jericho when over the noise of the crowd, a voice cried out. “Son of David, have mercy on me!” It was Bartimaeus, the blind beggar. When Jesus asked him, “What do you want me to do for you?” the response was quick and specific. “I want to see.”

The Portal

Sight is considered the most important of the five senses. The eye is the portal through which we collect information and send it to our brain for processing. We learn new things and make memories through our eyes. A person without sight lives in a dark, colorless world.

Physical blindness affects how we navigate our natural world. Spiritual blindness keeps light from penetrating our heart and soul. Ephesians 4:18 describes it this way: “Having their understanding darkened, being alienated from the life of God, because of the ignorance that is in them, because of the blindness of their heart” (NKJV).   Bartimaeus may have endured physical blindness, but his spiritual eyesight was clear. When he called out to the “Son of David,” his words show he recognized Jesus as the promised Messiah.

Each year I have an eye exam just to be sure my eye is healthy and there have been no changes in my vision. The doctor dilates my eyes, shines a light, measures the pressure, has me read from a chart, and uses various instruments to be sure all is well. Unlike at the ophthalmologist’s office, our spiritual vision cannot be checked by instruments and charts. Instead, we check it against the Word of God.

Protecting Our Eyes

It is important that we protect our spiritual eyes from anything damaging to our vision. Bartimaeus’s eyes were possibly injured by the bright sun and dust particles. Our vision can be damaged by the gritty atmosphere of unbelief and philosophies of the world.

“Whose minds the god of this age has blinded, who do not believe, lest the light of the gospel of the glory of Christ, who is the image of God, should shine on them” (II Corinthians 4:4, NKJV).

The old, familiar hymn “Amazing Grace” reminds us that we all once wandered in darkness, blinded by the things of the world, but grace has healed our sight.

Amazing grace! how sweet the sound,
That saved a wretch; like me!
I once was lost, but now am found,
Was blind, but now I see.

“Amazing Grace” by John Newton

Prayer: Dear Lord, give me clear vision so I can see the things of the Spirit. If any elements of this present world have clouded my sight of You, please heal me. I want to see, really see, all that You have for my life.

 

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Mary enjoys traveling, meeting new people, and spending time with old friends. Although directionally challenged, she would rather take the back roads with their discoveries than the boredom of the interstate.

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